Growing Pains

I was awoken by a stuffled cry.

In my sleepy haze I strained to hear… and eventaully heard it again.

Tears.  Agonizing tears.

I got up and went to my son.  He was sobbing quietly in his pillow, clutching his leg.

“My leg mom, it hurts.”

Wrapping my arms around him and holding on as tightly as I could, I felt my own tears forming, because I didn’t know what else I could do.

IMG_7980.colton

I remember growing pains when I was young.  I remember how painful they were and how confused I was.

My parents would tell me, “Your growing!”  And I would just shake my head.  What does that mean?

Colton has cried in my arms a couple times now.  And I am at a loss.

Can you help?

What do you do?  Would you give your child something for the pain?  How do you explain what a growing pain is?

 

Comments

comments

Comments

    Leave a Reply

    Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

    You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

  1. Natalie says

    I am so sorry for your son, and I can totally empathize with you. My oldest son has them, and when he does, they often hit him in the middle of the night. It might not the popular thing to do, but I will admit that I do give him Motrin for it, especially in the middle of the night. Honestly, I have tried rocking, comforting, and massaging, but it usually takes the Motrin before he can relax and go back to sleep comfortably.

  2. Natalie @ Cooking for My Kids says

    I am so sorry for your son, and I can totally empathize with you. My oldest son has them, and when he does, they often hit him in the middle of the night. It might not the popular thing to do, but I will admit that I do give him Motrin for it, especially in the middle of the night. Honestly, I have tried rocking, comforting, and massaging, but it usually takes the Motrin before he can relax and go back to sleep comfortably.

  3. says

    When I was a kid, my grandmother gave me a hot water bottle for the pain. Every night my mom filled it with the hottest water she could get from the tap, and tucked me into bed with it. It became sort of a lovey to me, too, even when I didn’t hurt it comforted me.

  4. says

    My son is going through this same thing right now…. it rots!
    My mom used to lay me down on the couch/bed and start by smoothing my hair …talking to me softly and telling me to pretend I was a noodle…floating in the pan!
    It sounds so weird as a grown up … and my husband laughed and laughed the first time I said that… but it worked for me when I was a kid and it works for SuperBoy…. the idea of relaxing…being calm…breathing.. when we are in pain we don’t breathe well…we tense our muscles…that makes the pain worse I think ….
    So goofy…but I’ll try anything when he cries like that!!

  5. Jessie says

    I’ve never commented before, but after reading this post and recalling my own experience with childhood growing pains, I thought I simply must comment. My mother also would provide something warm for my pains, like a hot water bottle, but also the “magic trick” for me as a little girl was a piece of cheese! Of course, this doesn’t really have an effect, but to a small child who believes it will, it is a great comfort :) I can certainly remember waking up many times, with pains in my legs so bad I could barely walk and calling to my mother for a piece of cheese, lol. If i had my cheese and a hot water bottle, I would know all would be okay again soon. Maybe come up with your own “magic cure”, give your son a hot water bottle, and I bet before you know it he will be able to drift back off to sleep.

  6. says

    Good blog.. I got the good information in this The biggest difference for us though, was to prevent them with the magnesium supplement. I can totally empathize with you. My oldest son has them, and when he does, they often hit him in the middle of the night.thanks for the blog..keep it up..

  7. Vikki says

    I’m old so my doctor told my mom it was just growing pains and nothing could be done but maybe a baby aspirin. Funny neither of my sisters had them and they were both tall. I was the shorty.
    When my nephew started getting them, my sister and I took him to the Dr and he suggested calcium. It actually lessened the severity within a few days. Of course now we know you need to keep a balance between calcium and magnesium so I agree with other posters on that.
    Since magnesium is a “brain” mineral it’s important that everyone maintain proper levels, just as calcium is for healthy bones. Might I suggest adding a bit of yogurt for more calcium and beans, nuts and/or green veggies to your menu to help for all the family.

  8. says

    My son gets them. But, we have found that it’s not the “bone” that hurts so much as his muscles. Since he has Asperger’s he’s especially sensitive to pain. When it’s really bad we do pain killer, a bath, and then stretch his muscles and massage his legs. (usually it hits in his calves)
    I’m not so sure if it’s actually “growing pains” as muscle cramps…or muscles stretching.