Drizzled with caramel and loaded with apples and pecans, these Caramel Apple Pecan Scones are the perfect fall breakfast and anytime coffee break treat! If you love caramel apple flavor, be sure to try Dwight’s Caramel Apple Pie.

Hand Picking up a Caramel Apple Pecan Scone

Caramel Apple Pecan Scone

Nothing says fall like a caramel apple, especially an apple just picked from the orchard, drizzled in caramel! I am not sure if that counts as breakfast, but by putting the caramel apple into my Caramel Apple Pecan Scone, I think we can get away with it! There is some debate as to the origin of the word scone, but I like to go with the Dutch word, ‘schoonbrot’, meaning beautiful bread. For other beautiful scone recipes, try my original scones, White Chocolate Raspberry Scone, or Blueberry Lemon Scone.

Overhead White Plate of Caramel Apple Pecan Scones

Caramel Apple Pecan Scone Recipe

Butter: I used unsalted butter for this recipe. The key to a good scone is to use cold, grated butter. This keeps the scones from spreading out to keep their flaky, moist texture.

Apple: I used Granny Smith apples for this recipe.

Pecans: I love what pecans bring to this recipe! You can always leave out the nuts for a nut-free scone.

Caramel: Storebought or homemade caramel sauce for the caramel drizzle will work in this recipe.

Drizzling Caramel on Apple Pecan Scones

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Bite taken out of a Caramel Apple Pecan Scone

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5 from 2 votes

Caramel Apple Pecan Scones

Prep Time 10 mins
Cook Time 18 mins
Chill 30 mins
Total Time 58 mins
The perfect fall treat, these Caramel Apple Pecan Scones pair perfectly with a coffee and crisp, morning air!

Ingredients

DOUGH

  • cups (313 g) all-purpose flour
  • ½ cup (100 g) granulated sugar
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon kosher salt
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • ½ cup (1 stick / 113 g) unsalted butter, cold, grated
  • 1 medium granny smith apple, peeled and finely diced
  • ½ cup pecans, chopped (optional)
  • cups (80 g) heavy cream
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 2 tablespoons heavy cream
  • 2 tablespoons turbinado sugar

TOPPING

Instructions

  • In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the flour, sugar, cinnamon, salt, and baking powder.
  • Work in the butter just until the mixture is unevenly crumbly; it's OK for some larger chunks of butter to remain unincorporated.
  • Add the chopped apple and pecans. Gently toss to coat.
  • In a separate bowl, mix together the heavy cream, eggs, vanilla.
  • Add the liquid ingredients to the dry ingredients and stir until all is moistened and holds together.
  • Line a baking sheet with parchment. Sprinkle a bit of flour atop the parchment or pan.
  • Scrape the dough onto the floured parchment or pan, and make a circle. The circle should be about ¾-inch thick.
  • Freeze for 30-60 minutes, uncovered. (Chilling the scones relaxes the gluten in the flour, which makes the scones more tender and allows them to rise higher. It also chills the fat (butter), which will make the scones a bit flakier.)
  • Preheat the oven to 425°F.
  • Remove from freezer and using a knife or bench scraper that you've run under cold water and dried, slice each circle into 6-8 wedges. (Much easier after chilling!)
  • Carefully pull the wedges away from the center to separate them just a bit; there should be about ½-inch space between them.
  • Brush scones with heavy cream, making sure to cover all exposed sides. Sprinkle with turbinado sugar.
  • Bake the scones in the upper part of your oven for 18-23 minutes, or until they are a light golden brown. When you pull one away from the others, it should look baked all the way through; the edge should not look wet or unbaked.
  • Remove the scones from the oven, and cool briefly on the pan.
  • Drizzle the caramel topping over the scones. Serve warm.

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Meet Amanda Rettke

Amanda Rettke is the creator of I Am Baker, and the bestselling author of Surprise Inside Cakes: Amazing Cakes for Every Occasion – With a Little Something Extra Inside.Over the course of her 15+ year blogging adventure, she has been featured in and collaborated with the Food Network, New York Times, LA Times, Country Living Magazine, People Magazine, Epicurious, Brides, Romantic Homes, life:beautiful, Publishers Weekly, The Daily Mail, Star Tribune, The Globe and Mail, DailyCandy, YumSugar, The Knot, The Kitchn, and Parade, to name a few.

Reader Comments

  1. Confused: When I look at the recipe online it says 2 1/2 cups flour. When I hit print it says .333 cups flour. There is obviously something I am doing wrong. HELP

    1. It says 2 1/2 cups flour which is 313g, or 313 GRAMS. 2 1/2 cups of flour equals 313g, that is just a clarification for folks who measure their ingredients.

  2. I have been making biscuits since I was seven years old. Yes, that was a very long time ago. Always looking for hints how to make even better biscuits. Using cold butter and milk certainly does that. Sometimes I even put the flour in the fridge, my apartment is so warm. Have not tried freezing dough yet. Try that next time.
    I cannot use the grated for the butter Especially when it gets down to the last pieces. Sometimes I have chopped the cold butter into tiny pieces and it seems to work okay. I can grate the apple w/o a lot of problems. I might add nutmeg
    with the cinnamon. Checking my kitchen to see if I have all the ingredients..

  3. I am NOT a baker but I threw together your recipe for plain scones and I’m sure my next batch will be more refined but I gotta tell you they are delicious !
    I will be making them again and often!

  4. My daughter is making these for fair. Her first try was amazing. I am wondering if we freeze these, would it be better to bake and then freeze or freeze the dough and bake for a little longer. We have to be gone the weekend before fair so we will be making them a few days beforehand and want to keep it as fresh as possible.

    1. Hi! I am not sure what the “best” method is, as I have only used this one—>
      Let the scones cool completely. Place in a re-sealable bag or airtight container to protect from freezer burn (I use parchment between them or wrap them in parchment). When ready to use I put them in the refrigerator overnight to slowly thaw. Then pop them into the microwave or oven for a second to warm. If this is a competition situation, I do recommend making it fresh.

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